$ 14.95

You Who?

Why You Matter and How to Deal With It

By Rachel Jankovic

Paperback. 246 Pages



Download a sample chapter of You Who?

If "Who am I?" is the question you're asking, Rachel Jankovic doesn't want you to "find yourself" or "follow your heart."

Those lies are nothing to the confidence, freedom, and clarity of purpose that come with knowing what is actually essential about you. And the answer to that question is at once less and more than what you are hoping for. Christians love the idea that self-expression is the essence of a beautiful person, but that's a lie, too. With trademark humor and no nonsense practicality, Rachel Jankovic explains the fake story of the Self, starting with the inventions of a supremely ugly man named Sartre (rhymes with "blart"). And we—men and women, young and old--have bought his lie of the Best Self, with terrible results.

Thankfully, that's not the end of our story, You Who: Why You Matter and How to Deal with It takes the identity question into the nitty gritty details of everyday life. Here's the first clue: Stop looking inside, and start planting flags of everyday faithfulness. In Christianity, the self is always a tool and never a destination.


"The human struggle with identity is so pervasive that it is commonplace to hear people say things like, 'I don’t even know who I am anymore.' This is not exclusive to unbelievers: it is also common among Christians. We have novels, stories, movies, and advertising campaigns about people who go on quests to find themselves—sometimes literal journeys, sometimes only spiritual or philosophical ones. That lost-self cry of 'Who am I?' is the cry of a person who suddenly realizes that the  philosophy he has been following around in the grocery store isn’t his mother after all..."


Rachel Jankovic says most Christian women are influenced more than they realize by prevailing existential self-love messages. In You Who? Why You Matter and How to Deal With It ... she identifies the un-Biblical philosophies of personhood and selfactualization that have seeped into the culture and church, fueling the widespread believe-in-yourself mantra, along with deceptions about abortion, feminism, and gender identity. Jankovic aims to define a Christian view of identity, one that puts to death the sinful self and receives new life in Christ.... I found grace spelled out in the pages, and a timely message for women and teenage girls.
- WORLD Magazine

Rachel's contention is that we have no practical idea of what makes us who we are, because we have absorbed too much of the world and its philosophies. As we grow up we adopt titles of identities that have either been thrust on us or that we take on ourselves. "Carefree grrrrl," or "The Fashionista" or "The Nerd" might satisfy for the moment, but they are a lie.
- Elizabeth PrataThe End Time blog